In the state of Georgia, a person is considered intoxicated if they are driving with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 percent. This means that even if the person is not exhibiting all of the signs and symptom of intoxication, they can still be convicted of drunk driving based solely upon a blood alcohol test. A DUI charge is a serious matter and a conviction can have lasting repercussions.

However, there is another form of DUI that is also very serious and that readers should be aware of. That is aggravated DUI, and there are several different ways that this charge may occur. One way is if the driver is alleged to have a blood alcohol concentration of at least .15 percent, or nearly twice the limit of a standard DUI charge.

Another way that a person may find themselves facing an aggravated DUI charge is by driving drunk with children in the vehicle. A third way that an aggravated DUI charge could be lodged against a driver is if they have more than one DUI conviction on their record.

Aggravated DUI charges may apply if a driver is alleged to have a high blood alcohol concentration or if they are in a position to put others at great risk of harm. An aggravated DUI charge can carry with it more severe penalties than those associated with standard DUI charges and, therefore, it is in the interest of a person confronted with an aggravated DUI charge to get legal help to overcome their legal hurdles.